Nearly Hair
“Nothing, is what it appears to be, when it's only with your eyes you see.”
― N'Zuri Za Austin

Solange Files: (Lipstick Catch)

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

For one I absolutely LOVE bananas..for now. I say for now because at some points when I am ready to eat the thought of Bananas just makes me sick! However the overall banana intake in my meals are a necessity.

After doing some research on how banana effect my diet I have come across the Morning Banana Diet. I was a bit concerned because I was told that banana were one of the highest calorie fruits that you could possibly eat but and thanks to web MD my concerns were addressed!

Source

via web MD

The Morning Banana Diet: What It Is

Ever since former opera singer Kumiko Mori announced she had lost 15 pounds on the "Morning Banana" diet, there has been a shortage of bananas in Japan, according to The Japan Times online. Billed as the fastest and easiest weight loss diet, the Morning Banana diet has taken Japan by storm.

The Morning Banana diet was developed by Hitoshi Watanabe, who studied preventive medicine in Tokyo, and his pharmacist wife, Sumiko. The diet has since gained popularity by word of mouth, web sites, TV shows, magazine articles, and a book written by the Watanabes.

All this goes to show that dieting is an international obsession, not just an American one. But could weight loss really be as simple as eating bananas?

The Morning Banana Diet: What You Can Eat

The Morning Banana Diet is a super simple plan. For breakfast, you have only bananas and room-temperature water. Then, you can eat whatever you like for lunch, dinner, and snacks, as long as you don't eat after 8 p.m. The only restrictions: No ice cream, dairy products, alcohol, or dessert after dinner, and the only beverage you may have with meals is room-temperature water. One sweet snack is allowed midafternoon.

One of the most popular aspects of the plan is the lack of emphasis on exercise. Dieters are advised to do it only if they want to, and even then, it should be done in a manner that is the least stressful.

The Morning Banana Diet: How It Works

Different versions of the Morning Banana Diet tout varying explanations of exactly how bananas work to promote weight loss. One theory suggests that certain enzymes in bananas speed up digestion and elimination, causing rapid weight loss. However, the human body already contains all the enzymes needed for digestion. It's true that foods with fiber (and bananas have some) can go through the digestive system more quickly and may not be completely absorbed, thus saving a few calories. But the calorie savings are certainly not enough to revolutionize the weight loss industry.

Another theory centers on resistant starch, a type of fiber that is supposed to promote fullness and increase fat burning. Resistant starch is found naturally in carbohydrate foods such as green bananas, potatoes, grains, and beans -- but only when you eat them cold. It resists digestion in the small intestine, where most digestion occurs, and gets passed along to the large bowel.

Studies show that the indigestible fiber may block the conversion of some carbs, but even so, bananas contain only a small amount of fiber and resistant starch. Bananas have 2-4 grams of fiber; to be considered a "good" source, a food must have 3.5-4.9 grams of fiber per serving.

Bananas, along with most fruits have long been a part of healthy diets and weight loss plans. But while they are nutritious, they do not have special weight loss properties.

The Morning Banana Diet: Bottom Line

Eating whatever you like at lunch, dinner, and snacks is no recipe for weight loss. To lose weight, you need to be physically active and control calories. And to stay healthy, you should choose healthy foods.

Not eating after 8 p.m. is good advice for those who tend to mindlessly snack after dinner. But make no mistake about it: There is nothing miraculous about not eating after 8 p.m. What matters are how many calories you consume (regardless of the time of day), and how many calories you burn.

And while eating breakfast does help to get your metabolism percolating, there's nothing magical about having a banana for your morning meal. Eating a banana and water for breakfast is easy enough and certainly a low-calorie option. Bananas range from 72-135 calories and 10-20 grams of sugar, depending on size. But even though bananas have some fiber, a pure carb breakfast usually leads to hunger within a few hours, and hunger is the downfall of dieters.

Instead, you could blend a banana with a few cubes of ice and a cup of plain, low-fat yogurt (150 calories and 12 grams protein) for a delicious, nutritious smoothie with staying power.

The Morning Banana Diet: Food for Thought

To feel full on the fewest calories, focus on eating healthy foods high in water and fiber, like beans, soups, vegetables, and fruits. Be sure to include lean protein, such as low-fat yogurt, lean meat, eggs, or nuts, to help keep hunger at bay.

The truth is that fad diets that restrict calories can result in weight loss, but it's almost always followed by quick weight regain. And experts agree that there is no food capable of burning off fat. If there were, we would not be coping with an obesity epidemic.

It may not be sexy or exciting, but to lose weight, you need to burn more calories than you eat. Period.

Kathleen Zelman, MPH, RD, is director of nutrition for WebMD and the WebMD Weight Loss Clinic. Her opinions and conclusions are her own.

Toned Tuesday’s: The Morning Banana Diet

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

For one I absolutely LOVE bananas..for now. I say for now because at some points when I am ready to eat the thought of Bananas just makes me sick! However the overall banana intake in my meals are a necessity.

After doing some research on how banana effect my diet I have come across the Morning Banana Diet. I was a bit concerned because I was told that banana were one of the highest calorie fruits that you could possibly eat but and thanks to web MD my concerns were addressed!

Source

via web MD

The Morning Banana Diet: What It Is

Ever since former opera singer Kumiko Mori announced she had lost 15 pounds on the "Morning Banana" diet, there has been a shortage of bananas in Japan, according to The Japan Times online. Billed as the fastest and easiest weight loss diet, the Morning Banana diet has taken Japan by storm.

The Morning Banana diet was developed by Hitoshi Watanabe, who studied preventive medicine in Tokyo, and his pharmacist wife, Sumiko. The diet has since gained popularity by word of mouth, web sites, TV shows, magazine articles, and a book written by the Watanabes.

All this goes to show that dieting is an international obsession, not just an American one. But could weight loss really be as simple as eating bananas?

The Morning Banana Diet: What You Can Eat

The Morning Banana Diet is a super simple plan. For breakfast, you have only bananas and room-temperature water. Then, you can eat whatever you like for lunch, dinner, and snacks, as long as you don't eat after 8 p.m. The only restrictions: No ice cream, dairy products, alcohol, or dessert after dinner, and the only beverage you may have with meals is room-temperature water. One sweet snack is allowed midafternoon.

One of the most popular aspects of the plan is the lack of emphasis on exercise. Dieters are advised to do it only if they want to, and even then, it should be done in a manner that is the least stressful.

The Morning Banana Diet: How It Works

Different versions of the Morning Banana Diet tout varying explanations of exactly how bananas work to promote weight loss. One theory suggests that certain enzymes in bananas speed up digestion and elimination, causing rapid weight loss. However, the human body already contains all the enzymes needed for digestion. It's true that foods with fiber (and bananas have some) can go through the digestive system more quickly and may not be completely absorbed, thus saving a few calories. But the calorie savings are certainly not enough to revolutionize the weight loss industry.

Another theory centers on resistant starch, a type of fiber that is supposed to promote fullness and increase fat burning. Resistant starch is found naturally in carbohydrate foods such as green bananas, potatoes, grains, and beans -- but only when you eat them cold. It resists digestion in the small intestine, where most digestion occurs, and gets passed along to the large bowel.

Studies show that the indigestible fiber may block the conversion of some carbs, but even so, bananas contain only a small amount of fiber and resistant starch. Bananas have 2-4 grams of fiber; to be considered a "good" source, a food must have 3.5-4.9 grams of fiber per serving.

Bananas, along with most fruits have long been a part of healthy diets and weight loss plans. But while they are nutritious, they do not have special weight loss properties.

The Morning Banana Diet: Bottom Line

Eating whatever you like at lunch, dinner, and snacks is no recipe for weight loss. To lose weight, you need to be physically active and control calories. And to stay healthy, you should choose healthy foods.

Not eating after 8 p.m. is good advice for those who tend to mindlessly snack after dinner. But make no mistake about it: There is nothing miraculous about not eating after 8 p.m. What matters are how many calories you consume (regardless of the time of day), and how many calories you burn.

And while eating breakfast does help to get your metabolism percolating, there's nothing magical about having a banana for your morning meal. Eating a banana and water for breakfast is easy enough and certainly a low-calorie option. Bananas range from 72-135 calories and 10-20 grams of sugar, depending on size. But even though bananas have some fiber, a pure carb breakfast usually leads to hunger within a few hours, and hunger is the downfall of dieters.

Instead, you could blend a banana with a few cubes of ice and a cup of plain, low-fat yogurt (150 calories and 12 grams protein) for a delicious, nutritious smoothie with staying power.

The Morning Banana Diet: Food for Thought

To feel full on the fewest calories, focus on eating healthy foods high in water and fiber, like beans, soups, vegetables, and fruits. Be sure to include lean protein, such as low-fat yogurt, lean meat, eggs, or nuts, to help keep hunger at bay.

The truth is that fad diets that restrict calories can result in weight loss, but it's almost always followed by quick weight regain. And experts agree that there is no food capable of burning off fat. If there were, we would not be coping with an obesity epidemic.

It may not be sexy or exciting, but to lose weight, you need to burn more calories than you eat. Period.

Kathleen Zelman, MPH, RD, is director of nutrition for WebMD and the WebMD Weight Loss Clinic. Her opinions and conclusions are her own.

 

Whole grains: Hearty options for a healthy diet

Pic Source

Find out why whole grains are better than refined grains and how to add more whole grains to your diet.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Grains, especially whole grains, are an essential part of a healthy diet. All types of grains are good sources of complex carbohydrates and some key vitamins and minerals. Grains are also naturally low in fat. All of this makes grains a healthy option. Better yet, they've been linked to a lower risk of heart disease, diabetes, certain cancers and other health problems.

The healthiest kinds of grains are whole grains. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that at least half of all the grains you eat are whole grains. Chances are you eat lots of grains already. But are they whole grains? If you're like most, you're not getting enough whole grains in your diet. See how to make whole grains a part of your healthy diet.

Types of grains

Also called cereals, grains and whole grains are the seeds of grasses cultivated for food. Grains and whole grains come in many shapes and sizes, from large kernels of popcorn to small quinoa seeds.

  • Whole grains. These are unrefined grains that haven't had their bran and germ removed by milling. Whole grains are better sources of fiber and other important nutrients, such as selenium, potassium and magnesium. Whole grains are either single foods, such as brown rice and popcorn, or ingredients in products, such as buckwheat in pancakes or whole wheat in bread.
  • Refined grains. Refined grains are milled, a process that strips out both the bran and germ to give them a finer texture and extend their shelf life. The refining process also removes many nutrients, including fiber. Refined grains include white flour, white rice, white bread and degermed cornflower. Many breads, cereals, crackers, desserts and pastries are made with refined grains, too.
  • Enriched grains. Enriched means that some of the nutrients lost during processing are added back in. Some enriched grains are grains that have lost B vitamins added back in — but not the lost fiber. Fortifying means adding in nutrients that don't occur naturally in the food. Most refined grains are enriched, and many enriched grains also are fortified with other vitamins and minerals, such as folic acid and iron. Some countries require certain refined grains to be enriched. Whole grains may or may not be fortified.

Via http://www.healthcastle.com/whole-grains.shtml

In January 2005, the US government published the new Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005. One of the new guidelines recommends that all adults eat half their grains as whole grains – that's at least 3 servings of whole grains a day.

whole grains health benefitsIncrease whole grain intake: An easy way to increase whole grain intake is to replace some of your refined-grain products with whole grain products.

  • have a slice of whole grain bread to replace your white bread
  • have a serving of whole grain breakfast cereal in the morning
  • substitute half the white flour with whole wheat flour in your regular recipes for cookies, muffins, quick breads and pancakes
  • add brown rice, wild rice or barley in your vegetable soup
  • snack on popcorn instead of chips on movie nights

 

whole grains health benefitswhole grains health benefitsCheck labels carefully! Foods labelled with the words "multi-grain," "stone-ground," "100% wheat," "cracked wheat," "seven-grain," or "bran" are usually not whole-grain products. Color is also not an indication of a whole grain. Brown does not necessary mean whole wheat or whole grain! Some brown bread has brown coloring added to achieve the brown color!

When determining if a packaged food product contains whole grain or not, look for the word "whole" in the ingredient list. Also look for the Whole Grain Stamp (see above examples). A "good source" stamp contains at least 1/2 serving of whole grains while an "excellent source" contains at least 1 serving of whole grains.

Toned Tuesdays: Healthy diet grains

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

 

Whole grains: Hearty options for a healthy diet

Pic Source

Find out why whole grains are better than refined grains and how to add more whole grains to your diet.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Grains, especially whole grains, are an essential part of a healthy diet. All types of grains are good sources of complex carbohydrates and some key vitamins and minerals. Grains are also naturally low in fat. All of this makes grains a healthy option. Better yet, they've been linked to a lower risk of heart disease, diabetes, certain cancers and other health problems.

The healthiest kinds of grains are whole grains. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that at least half of all the grains you eat are whole grains. Chances are you eat lots of grains already. But are they whole grains? If you're like most, you're not getting enough whole grains in your diet. See how to make whole grains a part of your healthy diet.

Types of grains

Also called cereals, grains and whole grains are the seeds of grasses cultivated for food. Grains and whole grains come in many shapes and sizes, from large kernels of popcorn to small quinoa seeds.

  • Whole grains. These are unrefined grains that haven't had their bran and germ removed by milling. Whole grains are better sources of fiber and other important nutrients, such as selenium, potassium and magnesium. Whole grains are either single foods, such as brown rice and popcorn, or ingredients in products, such as buckwheat in pancakes or whole wheat in bread.
  • Refined grains. Refined grains are milled, a process that strips out both the bran and germ to give them a finer texture and extend their shelf life. The refining process also removes many nutrients, including fiber. Refined grains include white flour, white rice, white bread and degermed cornflower. Many breads, cereals, crackers, desserts and pastries are made with refined grains, too.
  • Enriched grains. Enriched means that some of the nutrients lost during processing are added back in. Some enriched grains are grains that have lost B vitamins added back in — but not the lost fiber. Fortifying means adding in nutrients that don't occur naturally in the food. Most refined grains are enriched, and many enriched grains also are fortified with other vitamins and minerals, such as folic acid and iron. Some countries require certain refined grains to be enriched. Whole grains may or may not be fortified.

Via http://www.healthcastle.com/whole-grains.shtml

In January 2005, the US government published the new Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005. One of the new guidelines recommends that all adults eat half their grains as whole grains – that's at least 3 servings of whole grains a day.

whole grains health benefitsIncrease whole grain intake: An easy way to increase whole grain intake is to replace some of your refined-grain products with whole grain products.

  • have a slice of whole grain bread to replace your white bread
  • have a serving of whole grain breakfast cereal in the morning
  • substitute half the white flour with whole wheat flour in your regular recipes for cookies, muffins, quick breads and pancakes
  • add brown rice, wild rice or barley in your vegetable soup
  • snack on popcorn instead of chips on movie nights

 

whole grains health benefitswhole grains health benefitsCheck labels carefully! Foods labelled with the words "multi-grain," "stone-ground," "100% wheat," "cracked wheat," "seven-grain," or "bran" are usually not whole-grain products. Color is also not an indication of a whole grain. Brown does not necessary mean whole wheat or whole grain! Some brown bread has brown coloring added to achieve the brown color!

When determining if a packaged food product contains whole grain or not, look for the word "whole" in the ingredient list. Also look for the Whole Grain Stamp (see above examples). A "good source" stamp contains at least 1/2 serving of whole grains while an "excellent source" contains at least 1 serving of whole grains.

Via Natural Sunshine

I know many naturals have sworn off of heat styling, and I do go for long stretches of time without using any heat. Recently I've been impatient with drying time and I've been enjoying the look of blow dried hair. So for the past month I've been blow drying my hair after my weekly washes. AND (are you ready for this?) I haven't been using protective styling that much. As it turns out heat doesn't have to be my arch nemesis. Are there other naturalistas who would defend their blow dryers like a play cousin in the hood?

Before we were so close I was afraid of blow dryers. Like, I would cross the street and grab hold of my purse if I saw one... they scared me so much! For years blow dryers meant tired arms, lots of breakage, somewhat straight roots and crunchy frizzy ends. There is nothing attractive about any of that. But I no longer have that association with my blow dryer even though it is the same ole' dryer from high school! But the results are drastically different.


What changed? I learned about deep conditioning, diffusers/comb attachments and heat protectants. Now that I am diligent about the use of all three, I can blow dry my hair in a fraction of the time, I have much less breakage and my hair is smooth from root to tip. I deep condition my hair in twists after detangling. I finger detangle again while adding my homemade heat protectant. I prefer my comb attachment over a diffuser and separate comb, its seamless and wide-toothed and concentrates the heat on my strands for faster results with less effort. And um yes, I am using a $1.99 comb attachment from the beauty supply store!

All three things in conjunction improved the experience but I think I owe the majority of my success to my homemade heat protectant. Its worked so well for me I just had to share the recipe with you all. Click here for the full recipe and post your results if you use it.

 

 

How do you feel about your blow dryers?

Natural Sunshine: She loves her Blow Dryer

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Via Natural Sunshine

I know many naturals have sworn off of heat styling, and I do go for long stretches of time without using any heat. Recently I've been impatient with drying time and I've been enjoying the look of blow dried hair. So for the past month I've been blow drying my hair after my weekly washes. AND (are you ready for this?) I haven't been using protective styling that much. As it turns out heat doesn't have to be my arch nemesis. Are there other naturalistas who would defend their blow dryers like a play cousin in the hood?

Before we were so close I was afraid of blow dryers. Like, I would cross the street and grab hold of my purse if I saw one... they scared me so much! For years blow dryers meant tired arms, lots of breakage, somewhat straight roots and crunchy frizzy ends. There is nothing attractive about any of that. But I no longer have that association with my blow dryer even though it is the same ole' dryer from high school! But the results are drastically different.


What changed? I learned about deep conditioning, diffusers/comb attachments and heat protectants. Now that I am diligent about the use of all three, I can blow dry my hair in a fraction of the time, I have much less breakage and my hair is smooth from root to tip. I deep condition my hair in twists after detangling. I finger detangle again while adding my homemade heat protectant. I prefer my comb attachment over a diffuser and separate comb, its seamless and wide-toothed and concentrates the heat on my strands for faster results with less effort. And um yes, I am using a $1.99 comb attachment from the beauty supply store!

All three things in conjunction improved the experience but I think I owe the majority of my success to my homemade heat protectant. Its worked so well for me I just had to share the recipe with you all. Click here for the full recipe and post your results if you use it.

 

 

How do you feel about your blow dryers?

I did this challenge twice and I only have the video from my first attempt while my friend has the other so here it is!

First attempt

The Cinnamon Challenge! My attempt

Thursday, March 8, 2012

I did this challenge twice and I only have the video from my first attempt while my friend has the other so here it is!

First attempt

Though some people omit juice in their regular eating plans to reduce calories, juice is not all that bad. Its more of the processed juice that most people have to worry about in their dieting or regular eating process. The Juice for Health website helps many of us who seek health benefits from the food we eat to recognize better routes to enjoy foods without omitting them.

via Juice For health

More and more people are discovering that juicing fresh, raw, nutritious fruit and vegetables is a wonderful way to cleanse and re-energize the body, and help to protect against disease.

.

Pic Source

25 Tips to Make Your Own Juice for Health and Vitality!

  1. Before you start juicing consult a qualified health practitioner
  2. Juicing fruit can be the unsuitable for anyone who is over weight, has diabetes, or high blood pressure
  3. Plan ahead, decide which type of juicer(s) suits your needs
  4. Centrifugal juicers generate some heat which reduces nutrients, masticating juicers chew and squeeze out the juice preserving more nutrients
  5. Plan to make juicing part of your daily/weekly routine
  6. Keep your juicer on top of the kitchen work surface for easy access
  7. Placing a biodegradable or plastic bag in the pulp container means one less item to wash.
  8. The best time to drink juices is in the morning before eating anything else
  9. Juice before meals or 3 or 4 hours after a meal
  10. Only use fresh fruit and vegetables, the fresher the better
  11. If possible use seasonal local produce, pick your own, or ideally grow your own
  12. Juice organic produce if possible, alternatively wash everything thoroughly to remove any pesticide residues
  13. A good mix of fruit or vegetables in different colours will provide various nutrients
  14. Bear in mind that root vegetables (carrots, beets, etc.) are higher in sugar than other vegetables
  15. Remove any stones/kernels, seeds or pips are OK
  16. Juice the softer fruits/vegetables first, the harder ones will then force through any residue
  17. Start juicing what you like the taste of, add others gradually later
  18. Juice milder vegetables (celery, cucumber) before moving on to darker leafy greens
  19. When juicing leafy greens rolling them up tightly makes it easier to feed into the juicer
  20. Add a small amount of fruit (apple, lemon or grapes) to vegetable juices if taste is an issue
  21. A great way for children to get their vegetables – gradually add small amounts of vegetables when making their favourite juice
  22. Fresh juices loose nutrient value rapidly, for maximum benefit drink them immediately or within 15 minutes
  23. If you need to store some juice for a short time, add a little lemon or lime juice, use an airtight container leaving as little a gap as possible at the top, then refrigerate
  24. When having several juices per day, you can keep the removable parts in water in between juices
  25. Cleaning your juicer immediately after use is much easier, and it is ready for next time

Enjoy the benefits … juice for health!

Toned Tuesdays: 25 tips for juice #health

Tuesday, March 6, 2012

Though some people omit juice in their regular eating plans to reduce calories, juice is not all that bad. Its more of the processed juice that most people have to worry about in their dieting or regular eating process. The Juice for Health website helps many of us who seek health benefits from the food we eat to recognize better routes to enjoy foods without omitting them.

via Juice For health

More and more people are discovering that juicing fresh, raw, nutritious fruit and vegetables is a wonderful way to cleanse and re-energize the body, and help to protect against disease.

.

Pic Source

25 Tips to Make Your Own Juice for Health and Vitality!

  1. Before you start juicing consult a qualified health practitioner
  2. Juicing fruit can be the unsuitable for anyone who is over weight, has diabetes, or high blood pressure
  3. Plan ahead, decide which type of juicer(s) suits your needs
  4. Centrifugal juicers generate some heat which reduces nutrients, masticating juicers chew and squeeze out the juice preserving more nutrients
  5. Plan to make juicing part of your daily/weekly routine
  6. Keep your juicer on top of the kitchen work surface for easy access
  7. Placing a biodegradable or plastic bag in the pulp container means one less item to wash.
  8. The best time to drink juices is in the morning before eating anything else
  9. Juice before meals or 3 or 4 hours after a meal
  10. Only use fresh fruit and vegetables, the fresher the better
  11. If possible use seasonal local produce, pick your own, or ideally grow your own
  12. Juice organic produce if possible, alternatively wash everything thoroughly to remove any pesticide residues
  13. A good mix of fruit or vegetables in different colours will provide various nutrients
  14. Bear in mind that root vegetables (carrots, beets, etc.) are higher in sugar than other vegetables
  15. Remove any stones/kernels, seeds or pips are OK
  16. Juice the softer fruits/vegetables first, the harder ones will then force through any residue
  17. Start juicing what you like the taste of, add others gradually later
  18. Juice milder vegetables (celery, cucumber) before moving on to darker leafy greens
  19. When juicing leafy greens rolling them up tightly makes it easier to feed into the juicer
  20. Add a small amount of fruit (apple, lemon or grapes) to vegetable juices if taste is an issue
  21. A great way for children to get their vegetables – gradually add small amounts of vegetables when making their favourite juice
  22. Fresh juices loose nutrient value rapidly, for maximum benefit drink them immediately or within 15 minutes
  23. If you need to store some juice for a short time, add a little lemon or lime juice, use an airtight container leaving as little a gap as possible at the top, then refrigerate
  24. When having several juices per day, you can keep the removable parts in water in between juices
  25. Cleaning your juicer immediately after use is much easier, and it is ready for next time

Enjoy the benefits … juice for health!

The love of my life and I

March it out challenge: day 5

Monday, March 5, 2012

The love of my life and I

march challenge

I am a bit late but I am still participating! Its simple…Take a pic and post whatever the requirement is for that particular day =)

Unfortunately I don’t have a morning face because it is 10 pm but here is what it usually looks like…

The March Challenge: Day 4 #photographer

Sunday, March 4, 2012

march challenge

I am a bit late but I am still participating! Its simple…Take a pic and post whatever the requirement is for that particular day =)

Unfortunately I don’t have a morning face because it is 10 pm but here is what it usually looks like…

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